Reblogged from art x aurahack
gurafiku:

Japanese Movie Poster: The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On. 1987

gurafiku:

Japanese Movie Poster: The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On. 1987

Reblogged from Gurafiku
Reblogged from Mens Fashion Hooker

99percentinvisible:

omnisolidatum:

expo 67

The 1967 International and Universal Exposition or Expo 67, as it was commonly known, was the general exhibition, Category One World’s Fair held in MontrealQuebec, Canada, from April 27 to October 29, 1967. It is considered to be the most successful World’s Fair of the 20th century, with the most attendees to that date and 62 nations participating. It also set the single-day attendance record for a world’s fair, with 569,500 visitors on its third day.

Reblogged from 99% Invisible

girljanitor:

shoddyshit:

afrohoney:

A mix of nature to create beautiful afrocentric street art

2real

:0 <3

Reblogged from insane 20

Run like smoke and oakum.

sassingintothevoid:

Coffee porn.     (Cinemagraphs and gifs from this cool article.)

Reblogged from SassingintotheVoid

(Just a Few) Games to Play in 2014

Reblogged from Fly to the sky!

pixalry:

Pokemon Designs: #19 - 26 - Created by Thong Le

Be sure to follow the artist on TumblrTwitter, and Facebook. If you like this post, then check out his previous Pokemon designs here.

Reblogged from Pixalry
Reblogged from Mens Fashion Hooker

Photography: Omar Victor Diop

Reblogged from insane 20

beltsquid:

somarysueme:

….. is anyone gonna say it?

I mean it this is important.

Reblogged from King Koko
Reblogged from Airows
wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

Reblogged from Cos' è questo?